May 10, 2014; Ponte Vedra Beach, FL, USA; Matt Kuchar tees off on the 12th hole during the third round of The Players Championship at TPC Sawgrass - Stadium Course. Mandatory Credit: Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports

(Video) Johnny Miller And The Modern, Flat Golf Swing

If you ever read Ben Hogan’s Five Easy Lessons for Golf, you would understand the story of two planes during the golf swing. Ben taught us older golfers that during the back swing, the club was on one plane, and by moving your weight to the left side to start the down swing, the club was then on a new, and second plane.

When you watch older highlights, especially from the 70’s, you can see the upright two-plane swing that is referred to as the reverse C, but most players today no longer swing that way. Johnny Miller, Jack Nicklaus and Tom Watson all finished high with the reverse C.

The Reverse C kept the club-face square to the target line longer, but as Johnny explains in the video, it was terrible for your back. Today’s modern players are flatter with the back-swing, and fire at the target with their lower bodies during the down-swing.

This is an interesting tip from the two-time major champion, and NBC Golf Analyst at Sports Illustrated and Golf.com, Johnny Miller. He tells us how the modern players take the club back more inside and generate power from the rotation of the hips.

 

 

I know that as an older golfer, I have tried the flatter swing, and find I don’t get as much distance as I do when I get in the very high position at the top, but my accuracy is drastically improved, and more balls find the fairway. If I get a little too quick in the upright position, I usually block my tee shot, and end up on the right side of the fairway somewhere, or worse, in the trees.

This swing is great for my irons, as I tend to find more greens than when my swing plane gets to high. After all, that’s what we’re looking for, more greens, and an occasional birdie putt.

Source: SIGolf.com

Tags: Golf Johnny Miller Matt Kuchar Zach Johnson

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